Logjam at the Top – Kildare Group Friday, August 3rd

It was crowded at the top Friday, August 3rd. No fewer than four golfers, Howard Jones, Scott Thompson, Dave Kopp and Cris Caruso, turned in a gross 76 for the day. Gary Anzalone was one shot back at 77. Low net honors went to Howard Jones, that’s right, me! And there couldn’t have been a more deserving victor and nice guy. I need to pat myself on the back. After all, there wasn’t a single birdie on the card which means I won no gross skins and no net skins. My team lost second place in a scorecard play-off. The upshot of all this is I won low gross and low net and didn’t go home with a penny in winnings. I guess I should be grateful that Jim Gabriel wasn’t playing in my group; the last time he did, I marked my ball with a quarter and when I went to replace the ball, the quarter had been replaced with a dime and a nickel. Gabriel was the only one nearby.

Low Gross

  1. Howard Jones, Dave Kopp, Scott Thompson and Cris Caruso – 76

Low Net

  1. Howard Jones – 67
  2. Gary Anzalone – 68
  3. Dave Kopp and Jim Stamatis – 70

Five net skins paid $40 each to Cris Caruso, Jim Stamatis, Mike Forde and two to Skyler Irvine. Gross skins were split between Dave Kopp, Cris Caruso and Mike Wentrup.

The wind was blowing from green to tee on #8 Lakes with the tee nearly 190 yards from a back pin. It made that hole the meanest on the course with an average 1.14 strokes over par. Despite the logjam at the top, the course stilled played at an average of over 82.

Author: h. Alton Jones

writer/scientist/adventurer

2 thoughts on “Logjam at the Top – Kildare Group Friday, August 3rd”

  1. Your comment about Jim Gabriel reminds me of my experience, playing in a Pro Am at PGA West in 2006. I was marking my ball with a commemorative, gold-plated silver dollar and on the 17th green, I was going to be last to putt (pretty good 6 iron to within 8 ft of the pin!)
    I marked with the ‘gold’ dollar as usual and stood at the side of the green chatting to the pro’s caddy, an FSU gradute. When my playing partners had putted I walked to where I believed I had marked my ball, but couldn’t see my marker anywhere – just a white plastic marker.
    I asked my amateur partners if they had for some reason replaced my marker, to be met with shakes of the head.
    I then asked the pro about the situation. He asked me if I was sure I had marked with the gold dollar (which he had seen and commented upon). I said yes and then he explained that we, the team, had a potential problem in that if I couldn’t confirm that the white marker was exactly in the position I had marked the ball, my score on the hole was discounted, so my possible birdie was nul and void, which mattered to the team. After several minutes, during which I was seething, we agreed to move on to the 18th.
    I checked my pockets and golfbag a dozen times ( although I knew I had marked with the dollar!) and we finished the round, the team scoring 1 point more than the team finishing third overall – and great prizes!
    The pro’s caddy came up to me before I went to shower and change. “Between you and me, Laurence” he whispered, “While we were talking on the 17th, I think I saw John replace your marker. Can’t be absolutely sure, but…..”
    John was one of my amateur playing partners, allegedly a highly successful insurance broker from San Jose – and a 9 handicapper.
    So while we are having a beer with the group, I casually ask him if he saw what happened to my coin.
    “What?” he growls “are you suggesting I took it?”
    Before I had a chance to reply, he grabs his bottle of beer, gets up from his chair and storms off – never to be seen again – even at the prizegiving.
    The rest of my team laughed and one of them said “I guess we have the answer to the mystery of the missing dollar!”
    So that’s why I have a problem with insurance brokers!

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